Category Archives: compact disc

Sony SCD-XA9000ES

Sony came out in favour of SACD as its preferred digital audio format, leaving DVD-A for the likes of Pioneer and Matsushita. The company’s first machine was 1999’s SCD-1, followed by the second generation, multi channel SCD-XA777ES of 2002. Then,

Sony SCD-XA9000ES

Sony came out in favour of SACD as its preferred digital audio format, leaving DVD-A for the likes of Pioneer and Matsushita. The company’s first machine was 1999’s SCD-1, followed by the second generation, multi channel SCD-XA777ES of 2002. Then,

Arcam Delta 70/Black Box

The company’s first product, the A&R Cambridge A60 integrated amplifier, was a fine, worthy design with broad appeal to well healed, middle class audiophiles. Launched in 1976, it sold in huge quantities for a specialist British product, but after ten

Arcam Delta 70/Black Box

The company’s first product, the A&R Cambridge A60 integrated amplifier, was a fine, worthy design with broad appeal to well healed, middle class audiophiles. Launched in 1976, it sold in huge quantities for a specialist British product, but after ten

Marantz CD-45 Limited Edition

“When I first heard CD I was shocked”, Marantz brand ambassador Ken Ishiwata tells me. “I felt the potential of what you could do with this tiny disc – it was amazing. What surprised me most at first was its lack

Marantz CD-45 Limited Edition

“When I first heard CD I was shocked”, Marantz brand ambassador Ken Ishiwata tells me. “I felt the potential of what you could do with this tiny disc – it was amazing. What surprised me most at first was its lack

Marantz CD-54

The first Compact Disc players arrived in 1982 and reached British buyers a year later. This generation has since become largely forgotten, which is a shame because – ironically – many sound far more ‘analogue’ than much of today’s high end esoterica. The Marantz

Marantz CD-54

The first Compact Disc players arrived in 1982 and reached British buyers a year later. This generation has since become largely forgotten, which is a shame because – ironically – many sound far more ‘analogue’ than much of today’s high end esoterica. The Marantz

Marantz CD-52 Special Edition

When launched in 1982, opinions were strongly divided about the sound of Compact Disc. Initially there were two distinct CD player tribes – the Philips-based machines and the Japanese ones. The former, such as the Philips CD100, had DACs which only ran

Marantz CD-52 Special Edition

When launched in 1982, opinions were strongly divided about the sound of Compact Disc. Initially there were two distinct CD player tribes – the Philips-based machines and the Japanese ones. The former, such as the Philips CD100, had DACs which only ran

Cambridge Audio Sonata DV30

One British company that gets far too little recognition is Cambridge Audio, despite having a history of impressive, affordable audiophile products – and that is perhaps not surprising considering that so many who have – and/or do – work for

Cambridge Audio Sonata DV30

One British company that gets far too little recognition is Cambridge Audio, despite having a history of impressive, affordable audiophile products – and that is perhaps not surprising considering that so many who have – and/or do – work for

Audiolab 8000CDM

Nineteen ninety four was pretty much the high watermark for Audiolab in its original incarnation. It seemed like the company could do no wrong. The 8000A integrated amplifier had been repeatedly refined, and was now a seriously good sounding device –

Audiolab 8000CDM

Nineteen ninety four was pretty much the high watermark for Audiolab in its original incarnation. It seemed like the company could do no wrong. The 8000A integrated amplifier had been repeatedly refined, and was now a seriously good sounding device –

Sony CDP-101

Much has been written about this machine of late; it is fast becoming collectible. Of course it has a right to be, being not just Sony Corporation’s first ever silver disc spinner, but also the world’s first commercially available CD

Sony CDP-101

Much has been written about this machine of late; it is fast becoming collectible. Of course it has a right to be, being not just Sony Corporation’s first ever silver disc spinner, but also the world’s first commercially available CD

Astin Trew AT3500

Back in 2006 a new name appeared on the British hi-fi scene, launching a small range of mid-price hi-fi separates. The pick of this was the tube-buffered CD player, which sounded quite distinctively different to its price rivals. It didn’t take

Astin Trew AT3500

Back in 2006 a new name appeared on the British hi-fi scene, launching a small range of mid-price hi-fi separates. The pick of this was the tube-buffered CD player, which sounded quite distinctively different to its price rivals. It didn’t take

Sony DVP-S7000

Launched in March 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, the DVP-S7000 began to hit UK shores six months or so later and was one of the most prestigious and exciting of first generation DVD players. As ever with Sony’s ‘first’ ever product

Sony DVP-S7000

Launched in March 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, the DVP-S7000 began to hit UK shores six months or so later and was one of the most prestigious and exciting of first generation DVD players. As ever with Sony’s ‘first’ ever product

Micromega CD-30

In 2007, the well established French hi-fi brand Micromega was acquired by the flamboyant ex-motorsport man Didier Hamdi, leaving the company’s founder Daniel Schar to engineering duties. The 2010 CD-30 was one of the first products of the new epoch. On the

Micromega CD-30

In 2007, the well established French hi-fi brand Micromega was acquired by the flamboyant ex-motorsport man Didier Hamdi, leaving the company’s founder Daniel Schar to engineering duties. The 2010 CD-30 was one of the first products of the new epoch. On the

Sony RCD-W3

It was late 1998 that Sony’s first CD recorder was released in the company’s home market of Japan. At the time it came as something of a surprise, as Sony had previously intimated that MiniDisc was its rival to Philips’

Sony RCD-W3

It was late 1998 that Sony’s first CD recorder was released in the company’s home market of Japan. At the time it came as something of a surprise, as Sony had previously intimated that MiniDisc was its rival to Philips’

Esoteric P-0

Surprisingly few great CD transports have surfaced over the years, and you have to wonder why. Until computers showed up they were pretty much the only way of getting digits into your DAC, so they did – and still do

Esoteric P-0

Surprisingly few great CD transports have surfaced over the years, and you have to wonder why. Until computers showed up they were pretty much the only way of getting digits into your DAC, so they did – and still do

Meridian MCD Pro

Ever since its inception back in 1977, Meridian has been a great innovating company. Before its launch, founders Bob Stuart and Allen Boothroyd had already been involved in some of the most interesting hi-fi products to come out of the nineteen seventies – from the Lecson

Meridian MCD Pro

Ever since its inception back in 1977, Meridian has been a great innovating company. Before its launch, founders Bob Stuart and Allen Boothroyd had already been involved in some of the most interesting hi-fi products to come out of the nineteen seventies – from the Lecson

Cyrus dAD7

The nineteen nineties was Cyrus’s first decade, having previously been a mere sub-brand of loudspeaker specialist Mission. For this reason, it was an interesting time – a number of products appeared which showed the genesis of the company’s thinking, and

Cyrus dAD7

The nineteen nineties was Cyrus’s first decade, having previously been a mere sub-brand of loudspeaker specialist Mission. For this reason, it was an interesting time – a number of products appeared which showed the genesis of the company’s thinking, and

Esoteric X-05

Every Japanese company has a specialisation; something about which it’s particularly proud. With Sony it was always innovation and miniaturisation, with Matsushita it was always reliability and affordability (just like Honda and Toyota respectively). Nakamichi’s oeuvre was always cassette, Pioneer made

Esoteric X-05

Every Japanese company has a specialisation; something about which it’s particularly proud. With Sony it was always innovation and miniaturisation, with Matsushita it was always reliability and affordability (just like Honda and Toyota respectively). Nakamichi’s oeuvre was always cassette, Pioneer made

Sony CDP-557ESD

Remember the CD player numbers game? The first Philips-based machines had 14-bit, 4 times oversampling, the original Japanese used 16-bits. Then in 1986 the 16×4 Philips players arrived and by 1988 a raft of 18×8 machines appeared from the Orient.

Sony CDP-557ESD

Remember the CD player numbers game? The first Philips-based machines had 14-bit, 4 times oversampling, the original Japanese used 16-bits. Then in 1986 the 16×4 Philips players arrived and by 1988 a raft of 18×8 machines appeared from the Orient.

Naim CDX2

When the Naim CDX2 was launched in 2003, it seemed that Compact Disc was beginning to falter, faced as it was with an onslaught from SACD and DVD-Audio. So for Naim to pitch a new CD player right into the

Naim CDX2

When the Naim CDX2 was launched in 2003, it seemed that Compact Disc was beginning to falter, faced as it was with an onslaught from SACD and DVD-Audio. So for Naim to pitch a new CD player right into the

Marantz SA-12S1

After the stereophonic splendour of the SA-1 – Marantz’s first SACD player launched in 2001 – came the multi-talented, multimedia, multichannel SA-12. This little beauty not only played Red Book CDs and SACDs (of both the stereo and multichannel variety)

Marantz SA-12S1

After the stereophonic splendour of the SA-1 – Marantz’s first SACD player launched in 2001 – came the multi-talented, multimedia, multichannel SA-12. This little beauty not only played Red Book CDs and SACDs (of both the stereo and multichannel variety)

Marantz CD-73

The top model in the company’s first generation range of CD players, it shared much of its genetic make-up with a Philips machine – the CD303. To wit, its line up of component parts reads like a wish list from

Marantz CD-73

The top model in the company’s first generation range of CD players, it shared much of its genetic make-up with a Philips machine – the CD303. To wit, its line up of component parts reads like a wish list from