Category Archives: turntables

SEE Corporation Revolver

Made by Sundown Electronic Engineering, Ltd. (also called The SEE Corporation) in Warrington, England, the Revolver turntable was aimed at a very specific niche of the nineteen eighties affordable audiophile turntable market. It sold through a network of small independent specialist

SEE Corporation Revolver

Made by Sundown Electronic Engineering, Ltd. (also called The SEE Corporation) in Warrington, England, the Revolver turntable was aimed at a very specific niche of the nineteen eighties affordable audiophile turntable market. It sold through a network of small independent specialist

Dual CS606

It is hard to understate the decline of Dual, which had once been one of the largest manufacturers of turntables in Europe, with over three thousand employees working across several factories in West Germany, at the peak of that country’s

Dual CS606

It is hard to understate the decline of Dual, which had once been one of the largest manufacturers of turntables in Europe, with over three thousand employees working across several factories in West Germany, at the peak of that country’s

Reloop Turn5

German brand Reloop has been making pro audio equipment since 1996, and duly formed a specialist hi-fi division two years ago. The £650 Turn5 is the top model in the company’s turntable range, and is – to all intents and purposes

Reloop Turn5

German brand Reloop has been making pro audio equipment since 1996, and duly formed a specialist hi-fi division two years ago. The £650 Turn5 is the top model in the company’s turntable range, and is – to all intents and purposes

Sony PS-X40

The nineteen seventies was ‘the Golden Age of Vinyl’, and Sony played an important part in making it so. Although the specialist audiophile market was preoccupied with belt-driven British superdecks such as Linn’s Sondek and Dunlop’s Systemdek, the wider turntable

Sony PS-X40

The nineteen seventies was ‘the Golden Age of Vinyl’, and Sony played an important part in making it so. Although the specialist audiophile market was preoccupied with belt-driven British superdecks such as Linn’s Sondek and Dunlop’s Systemdek, the wider turntable

Origin Live Aurora Mk3

Launched in 2014 for a whisker under £1,000, the Aurora was the baby in the company’s four-strong range of turntables. Like the original which appeared back in 2003, it’s a high quality skeletal belt drive design hewn from black acrylic

Origin Live Aurora Mk3

Launched in 2014 for a whisker under £1,000, the Aurora was the baby in the company’s four-strong range of turntables. Like the original which appeared back in 2003, it’s a high quality skeletal belt drive design hewn from black acrylic

Walker CJ58

By the time that Compact Disc arrived in 1983, Britain had a surfeit of fine belt drive turntables on sale. From the Rega Planar 3 and Ariston RD80 to the Strathclyde 305, Dunlop Systemdek and Linn Sondek LP12, there were

Walker CJ58

By the time that Compact Disc arrived in 1983, Britain had a surfeit of fine belt drive turntables on sale. From the Rega Planar 3 and Ariston RD80 to the Strathclyde 305, Dunlop Systemdek and Linn Sondek LP12, there were

Heybrook TT2

By 1980 when the Heybrook TT2 came out, almost every major development in turntable design had already happened. We had got quartz-locked direct drive, but British manufacturers largely eschewed it on cost grounds. So most UK decks were variations on

Heybrook TT2

By 1980 when the Heybrook TT2 came out, almost every major development in turntable design had already happened. We had got quartz-locked direct drive, but British manufacturers largely eschewed it on cost grounds. So most UK decks were variations on